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~Welcome to the Friends of the Baraboo Zoo! 

The Friends of the Baraboo Zoo, Inc. is a 501c3 Non-profit established in 1984.  Support this 5013c organization

Our purpose is to raise funds to support the betterment of Baraboo’s Zoo, Ochsner’s Park Zoo.  All monies acquired will be used towards projects and/or improvements for the enhancement of Ochsner’s Park Zoo.  These projects shall be determined by the Board of Directors of the Friends of the Baraboo Zoo following presentation and recommendations by the Baraboo Parks and Recreation Board.

Support Baraboo ZooThe Friends of the Baraboo Zoo (FOBZ) has raised over $526,000.00 that has been contributed to improvements and new exhibits at Ochsner Park Zoo.  In addition to the funds that have been River Otters Imagedispersed, just over $320,000.00 has been raised towards the installation of a Brand New River Otter Exhibit.   The FOBZ has been working diligently  for several years raising funds for this exhibit; fundraising efforts will continue into 2017 to acquire the remainder of funds needed.

Ochsner Zoo is ONE of just FIVE small municipal FREE zoos in the state of Wisconsin!

2017 Friends of the Baraboo Zoo Board of Directors:
Amber Giddings, President
Sandy Gavin, Vice President
Tim Lowe, Secretary
Peggy Goodenow, Treasurer
Bill Hays, Director
Lori Burdick, Director
Shannon Johnson, Director
Becky Hovde, Director
Christy Badgero, Director
Joe Colossa, Director
Brian Scarborough, Director

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Choose treats that protect rainforests! ... See MoreSee Less

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6 days ago

Friends of the Baraboo Zoo

Welcome Wrigley!Meet Wrigley our new resident mallard. Wrigley was raised by humans from an egg then confiscated by the Wisconsin DNR just a few weeks ago. Wrigley lived at the Dane County Humane Society's Wildlife Center for a bit until they could determine whether there was any imprinting or, at the very least, habituation to humans.

Well, Wrigley follows staff everywhere and seems to be attached to them like Velcro.

When a duck hatches, what it sees 24-48 hours after hatching (this is known as the “critical period”) is what it “knows” itself to be. It is what it will follow without hesitation because being a nidifugous bird (leaving the nest shortly after hatching) it must have a strong bond to its “mother”. Wrigley was said to have been taken as an egg and because of that did not see an adult mallard during this critical period. Wrigley’s mother was a human and that cannot change for her now.

Baby geese and ducks are often brought in by well meaning people and hand raised throughout the summer months. People assume they are helping the animal and that they can easily release it after it’s grown. Unfortunately, many of these individuals don’t assimilate into wild populations and tend to become nuisance birds once out in their own....they simply want to be around people more than birds. Wrigley got lucky because if the rehab facility couldn’t have found a USFWS approved permanent home, euthanasia was the only other option.

The best way to help these birds is to call a local wildlife rehabilitation center or licensed individual and let them care for the animal. They know how to limit the possibility of the birds imprinting or becoming habituated to humans. Put the bird in a small covered container with air holes and get it to a rehab facility right away. Many facilities have other young birds or foster parents (non releasable adult birds) to place the baby with so it imprints on its own species.

Wrigley will be out on exhibit with our swan and two geese. If all goes well, she will live out her life with Gary, Lucky, and Snowflake.
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1 week ago

Friends of the Baraboo Zoo

🐢💚We like to debunk myths about turtles, so here's one that we often hear. 'Turtles are easy to care for, just get a nice tank, right?' FALSE! Turtles are wild animals and need safe outdoor space. Would you spend your life in a bathtub? Same difference. Be kind to our shelled friends. #turtletuesday #rescue #wildanimals #wildlife #no tanks ... See MoreSee Less

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1 week ago

Friends of the Baraboo Zoo

Please. Consider planting a tree versus a balloon release!This white-headed petrel, a seabird of the southern ocean, recently came into the hands of wildlife carers in a starving condition and unfortunately did not survive. Upon necropsy it was discovered that its digestive system was stuffed full of something we see all too often, a red party balloon with the ribbon still attached 🎈

If you use balloons for celebrations please ensure they are properly disposed of so they are not mistaken for food by our precious wildlife.
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1 week ago

Friends of the Baraboo Zoo

Animal instincts at their best!Even the owls know where to go when the temperatures get a little lower then they are used to.

Although the Great Horned and Barred owls are both native species they still seek shelter when temperatures drop.

Henrietta and Guinevere were deemed non releasable wild birds due to injuries sustained during car collisions and both have lost portions of their left wing.

Henrietta chooses to perch higher up in the bear trees but Guinevere chooses to perch closer to the ground.
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